Feb
22
Sat
Multimedia play: Hear Me Say My Name @ National Museum of the American Indian
Feb 22 @ 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM

Multimedia play: Hear Me Say My Name
Saturdays: Feb. 15, 22, and 29, 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater

“I am not your mascot, and I don’t live in a tipi. See me for who I am, hear me say my name.” How do stereotypes of American Indians, prejudice, and identity shape the discussion of what it means to be a young person in our country today? This original multimedia play, created in collaboration with Smithsonian Associates Discovery Theater, tackles America’s assumptions about American Indians and starts a conversation with audiences reclaiming rich history, challenges, hopes, and dreams. After the play, the audience is invited to explore the museum’s Americans exhibition to learn more.

This program is generously supported by the Rasmuson Foundation. Free; first-come, first-served seating. No registration is required.

Feb
23
Sun
Guatemalan National Day of Marimba @ National Museum of the American Indian
Feb 23 @ 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Guatemalan National Day of Marimba

Sunday, Feb. 23, 2 p.m.

The marimba is recognized by the Organization of American States as part of the Cultural Heritage of the Americas. Celebrate Guatemala’s National Day of Marimba with performances by local marimba groups.

Presented in collaboration with the Consulate of Guatemala.

Feb
29
Sat
Multimedia play: Hear Me Say My Name @ National Museum of the American Indian
Feb 29 @ 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM

Multimedia play: Hear Me Say My Name
Saturdays: Feb. 15, 22, and 29, 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater

“I am not your mascot, and I don’t live in a tipi. See me for who I am, hear me say my name.” How do stereotypes of American Indians, prejudice, and identity shape the discussion of what it means to be a young person in our country today? This original multimedia play, created in collaboration with Smithsonian Associates Discovery Theater, tackles America’s assumptions about American Indians and starts a conversation with audiences reclaiming rich history, challenges, hopes, and dreams. After the play, the audience is invited to explore the museum’s Americans exhibition to learn more.

This program is generously supported by the Rasmuson Foundation. Free; first-come, first-served seating. No registration is required.

Mar
14
Sat
Wikipedia Edit-a-thon: Women Artists of Latin America @ National Museum for Women in the Arts
Mar 14 @ 10:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Wikipedia Edit-a-thon: Women Artists of Latin America
Saturday, March 14, 10 a.m.–3 p.m.
NMWA hosts its 7th annual Art+Feminism edit-a-thon, which aims to improve Wikipedia entries related to notable women artists and art world figures. This year’s event will focus on women artists of Latin America. Held in collaboration with Wikipedia Edit-a-thons across the city at the libraries of the National Gallery of Art, the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Hirshhorn Museum, NMWA’s edit-a-thon also commemorates the adoption of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920, which granted women the right to vote. This event is part of a global initiative to help improve Wikipedia’s gender imbalance. In 2019, more than 3,800 Art+Feminism participants created or improved 21,000 Wikipedia pages. Free. No reservations required. No experience necessary; bring a laptop, motivation to combat gender bias and a belief in equal access to quality resources. People of all gender identities and expressions are invited.

Dance Performance: The Mush Hole: Truth, Acknowledgement, Resilience @ National Museum of the American Indian
Mar 14 @ 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Dance Performance: The Mush Hole: Truth, Acknowledgement, Resilience

Kaha:wi Dance Theatre

Santee Smith, Artistic Director

Saturday, March 14, 2 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater

The Mush Hole is a heartbreaking dance theater piece that moves through Canada’s residential school history with hope and empathy. The performance by Kaha:wi Dance Theatre, created, directed, produced by Santee Smith, reflects the realities of the Mohawk Institute Residential School experience and offers a compelling way to open dialogue and to heal. Created in collaboration with Mohawk Institute Residential School survivors and including school documentation in recounting its history, The Mush Hole is about survival and intergenerational resilience.

The Mohawk Institute, also known as the Mush Hole, is Canada’s oldest residential school, after which all other residential schools were modeled. Operating in Brantford, Ontario, from 1828 to 1970, the Mohawk Institute served as a boarding school for First Nations children from Six Nations and other communities in Ontario and Quebec. It was a key tool in the effort to assimilate First Nations children into European Christian society and sever the continuity of First Nations culture from parent to child, leaving a legacy of trauma.

Mar
21
Sat
Through Her Eyes: Celebrating Indigenous Women of the Andes @ National Museum of the American Indian
Mar 21 @ 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Through Her Eyes: Celebrating Indigenous Women of the Andes

Saturday, March 21, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

Potomac Atrium

A special Women’s History Month program, Through Her Eyes celebrates the stories, experiences and perspectives of Andean Indigenous women. Cultural and content experts will lead a series of performances, demonstrations and activities offering visitors a window into the rich traditions and contemporary life of women in these Indigenous communities.

Julia Garcia (Quechua) will demonstrate how to dress a fashionable llama. Did you know that colorful ear tassels are a clue to a llama’s ownership and that bells can help you find your llama in the dark? Visitors can learn how to make ear tassels and neck adornments fit for a llama. Isabel Hawkins will share stories woven into Andean textiles, including the cardinal direction markers, constellations and equinox symbols that make up the patterns of some Andean textiles. Zuly Jimenez (Quechua) will use potatoes to create figures for a retablo (a small scene represented in a box frame).

The museum’s Collections Conservation staff will share their expertise on the care of weavings. Kathleen Martin, Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Textile Conservation, will discuss her research, show samples and demonstrate the indigo dye process. Conservator Susan Heald will lead a hands-on demonstration with cochineal and show how the color can be shifted from orange to red to purple, and conservator Emily Kaplan will share the history of ceremonial drinking cups called qeros.

Maryta de Humahuaca in Concert @ National Museum of the American Indian
Mar 21 @ 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Maryta de Humahuaca in Concert

Saturday, March 21, 3 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater

 

Maryta de Humahuaca (Kolla) is an Indigenous performing artist from the small city of Humahuaca in the province of Jujuy, Argentina. Her music is a fusion of contemporary and traditional Andean music. This program is presented in collaboration with the Embassy of the Argentine Republic.

Mar
24
Tue
Photographer’s Talk: Developing Stories: Native Photographers in the Field @ National Museum of the American Indian
Mar 24 @ 3:30 PM – 5:30 PM

Photographer’s Talk: Developing Stories: Native Photographers in the Field

Tuesday, March 24, 3:30 p.m.

Sealaska Gallery

 

Museum visitors are invited to join photographer Russel Daniels and curator Cécile Ganteaume in a conversation and gallery tour highlighting Daniels’s “Genízario Pueblo de Abiquiú,” the first of three photo essays in the exhibition series “Developing Stories: Native Photographers in the Field.” Daniels’s photographs and text explore northern New Mexico’s Genízario community, a people whose historic experience of violence, slavery, and resilience shapes their sense of self to this day.

Mar
28
Sat
Symposium: Thoughts of Our People from Hearts of Our People @ National Museum of the American Indian
Mar 28 @ 2:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Symposium: Thoughts of Our People from Hearts of Our People

Saturday, March 28, 2 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater

Women have long been the creative force behind Native American art. The critically acclaimed exhibition Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists, on view at the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery, explores the artistic achievements of Native women and establishes their rightful place in the art world. Join artists Kelly Church (Ottawa/Pottawatomi), Anita Fields (Osage), Carla Hemlock (Kanienkeháka), and Jolene Rickard (Tuscarora) for a conversation about their work and the role of women as artists in Native communities.

Exhibition curators Jill Ahlberg Yohe, associate curator of Native American Art at the Minneapolis Institute of Art, and Teri Greeves, an independent curator and member of the Kiowa Nation, moderate a panel discussion following the artists’ talks. The symposium is a collaboration of the National Museum of the American Indian and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists is organized by the Minneapolis Institute of Art. The exhibition has been made possible in part by a major grant from the Henry Luce Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the Human Endeavor.

The presentation at the Renwick Gallery is organized in collaboration with the National Museum of the American Indian. Generous support has been provided by the James F. Dicke Family Endowment, Chris G. Harris, the Wolf Kahn and Emily Mason Foundation, Jacqueline B. Mars, the Provost of the Smithsonian, the Share Fund, the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative, and the WEM Foundation.

Apr
7
Tue
Rocks as Art—A Chinese Tradition @ Hillwood Museum and Gardens
Apr 7 @ 5:30 PM – 8:30 PM

Rocks as Art—A Chinese Tradition

Tuesday, April 7, 2020, 5:30-8:30 p.m. (Lecture begins at 7:30 p.m.)

Jan Stuart, Melvin R. Seiden Curator of Chinese Art at the National Museum of Asian Art, will investigate the symbolic and aesthetic traditions associated with the Chinese cultural appreciation for rocks, including pieces such as jade carvings and natural rocks mounted on pedestals.

Please note: This is the third and final program in the Natural Beauties lecture series.

www.HillwoodMuseum.org 

4155 Linnean Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20008

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  1. Pingback: KSK Wins #DCTweeps Social Butterfly « K Street Kate

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  3. DoubleTree by Hilton Celebrates “National Cookie Month” in Washington DC with “Sweet Rides” for Amtrak Passengers.

    DoubleTree by Hilton is teaming up with Amtrak to delight travelers by giving DC and Baltimore-area communters a “sweet” surprise for National Cookie Month. On Thursday, October 8, DoubleTree by Hilton and Amtrak tam members will give away the hotel brand’s signature chocolate chip cookie and walnut cookies along select Amtrak trains for Washington, DC Union Station to Baltimore Penn Station.

    Travelers and fans around the world are also invited to share a photo or story from the own “sweet” DoubleTree by Hilton experience using #CookieCare for the chance to win a variety of rewards, ranging from free cookies to hotel stays.

    The “sweet rides” are part of DoubleTree by Hilton’s Cookie Car program, which celebrates the brand’s global commitment to delivering the “little things” that enhance guests’ travel experiences.

    WHEN/WHERE:
    Amtrak Northeast Regional Routes from Union Station to Baltimore Penn Station
    Thursday, October 8, 2015
    11:30 AM -6:00 PM

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