‘Living in the Age of Airplanes’ Debuts at Smithsonian’s Air & Space Museum

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It’s a modern day miracle that we may take for granted… or even get annoyed with from time to time.

Living in the Age of Airplanes is a new documentary filmed by director Brian J. Terwilliger and his team — in 18 countries and all 7 continents over the course of several years — that offers a fresh perspective on this transportation magic that has made our global lifestyle possible: flying.

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Narrated by Harrison Ford (and with an original Score by Academy-Award winning composer James Horner (AVATAR; TITANIC)), the National Geographic partnership documentary explains how airplanes have empowered a century of global connectedness our ancestors could never have imagined.  “What was once migration is now vacation,” narrates Ford, “Mankind went from 3mph to 500 mph in less than 100 years…. now we are walking distance to almost anywhere… The faster people and ideas can connect with each other, the faster the progress of the modern world.”

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Through a series of nature scenes, airport and airlines montages, and even a “case study” of the perishable flower industry, Living in the Age of Airplanes highlights the astonishingly rapid advancements that have led to a world in which 100,000 flights take off and land every day.

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“Airplanes have always been a passion of mine,” director Terwillinger told K Street Magazine.  “It’s ironic that at a time when flight has made such an impact on the modern world, frustration with flight is also at an all-time high.  We’re jaded because — though it is relatively new — flight just seems so ordinary to us… So [this documentary] is just a slice of the wonder and beauty of aviation.”

A special preview with the director screened in advance at Smithsonian’s National Air & Space Museum. The film will be released on giant screen, digital, IMAX® and museum cinemas worldwide beginning on April 10, 2015.

*All images courtesy

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